This image: a building at Symmetry Park, Bicester. The map: there is a green marker inside a red line boundary, indicating the site of the proposed Hinckley National Rail Freight Interchange, with Nuneaton to the west and Leicester to the north-east.

Welcome to the public consultation for the Hinckley National Rail Freight Interchange (HNRFI). This interactive document will guide you through our proposals and ask for your feedback at the end through a short feedback form.




We are still in the design process, and the following sections set out what we would like to do, but this is not final. We now want help from residents, businesses and stakeholders in the local area to provide feedback on our ideas.

The formal consultation will close on Wednesday 9th March 2022. The feedback provided in this consultation will be used to influence future design considerations.


info Look out for green highlighted text like this - it will indicate interactive features on the map.


Map key
Hinckley NRFI site location
Hinckley NRFI red line boundary
Rail lines

Nationally Significant


This image: a building at Symmetry Park, Biggleswade. The map: An illustrative map of main freight routes around the UK, including the East Coast Main Line, West Coast Main Line, the Felixtowe to Nuneaton Main Line, and other and future main lines. The map is also labelled with major ports and rail connections.

We all rely on logistics, from the food we eat to the clothes we wear. Logistics is the lifeblood on which the national economy thrives. It provides the everyday essentials we take for granted for our homes, businesses, hospitals, and leisure facilities.

We need to move items from raw material producers through production and into our domestic supply chains to meet this demand. Every logistics channel needs to be efficient and cost-effective; otherwise, we may face empty shelves and stalled production lines.

However, during the pandemic, it became apparent how critical and often fragile international and national supply chains are.

HNRFI will be a critical part of the UK's strategic freight infrastructure, bolstering the national capacity and essential for the regional and national economy.


Map key
Hinckley NRFI site location
Key ports
Channel Tunnel connection
East Coast Main Line (illustrative)
West Coast Main Line (illustrative)
Felixstowe to Nuneaton Main Line (illustrative)
Other Main Line (illustrative)
Future Main Line (illustrative)

An increased demand for logistics at the heart of the UK


This image: a building at Symmetry Park, Kettering. The map: a map of the Midlands centred on the HNRFI site. The inner golden triangle between Leicester, Coventry and Daventry is highlighted in yellow, and the wider golden triangle between Birmingham, Nottingham and Milton Keynes in orange. Motorways are highlighted in blue. There are green map markers which display more information about these locations when you click on them.

HNRFI is centrally located between the West Coast Main Line and the East Coast Main Line, on Network Rail's Strategic Freight line connecting the deep sea ports pf Felixstowe and London Gateway to the Midlands and the North.

The site sits within The Golden Triangle for logistics, an area of the east and west midlands with the best access in the UK to the rail and road freight networks.

The heart of the logistics industry is located here, which over the last 40 years has developed due to its central location within the national economy and the vibrant industrial base both within it and nearby. This has been informed by
the Leicester and Leicestershire Strategic Distribution Study, 2021. The document recognises the need for Strategic Rail Freight Interchanges and specifically references HNRFI.

No other terminal will be so well connected to the UK's major ports.

Accelerated by the pandemic, the past decade has seen the logistics sector undergo a remarkable transformation, reshaping operating models and occupier requirements.

Technology is replacing the most routine jobs through automation and self-driving vehicles whilst accelerating the shift towards a higher-skilled labour force in the sector.

Previously the logistics sector jobmarket comprised a higher proportion of managers and warehouse operatives. This has now changed with a higher percentage of Professional and Associate Professional and Technical roles and a lower share of more routine occupations.


info Click on the map markers to read more about the location of HNRFI.


Map key
Information about HNRFI location
Information about the Golden Triangle and logistics in the Midlands
Inner Golden Triangle
Wider Golden Triangle
Motorways

Connected Employment


This image: a photo of workers in an operational logistics warehouse. The map: a map of the Midlands centred on the HNRFI site. The catchment of potential employees for HNRFI is shown in orange, covering parts of Leicester, Coventry, Tamworth and other built up areas in the Midlands. The map also shows grey lines indicating driving distances by car, 30 minutes and 60 minutes from HNRFI.

HNRFI’s catchment area of potential employees includes 1,036,900 people aged between 16-64 with almost 80% being economically active. There are circa 33,000 unemployed people in the catchment area (orange on the map) with 11,200 being in the 16-24 age group.

The catchment area has a higher proportion of residents employed in the logistics sector than the national average. This reflects the higher proportion of opportunities in these sectors, in what is the prime location for national logistics operations.

The area surrounding the Main HNRFI Site does not have large concentrations of deprivation, except the south-west of Hinckley. However, neighbouring Nuneaton and Bedworth have a few communities in the top 10% and 20% most deprived areas, as do Coventry and Leicester.


Map key
Hinckley NRFI site location
Catchment area of potential employees
30 minute drive time from the site by car
60 minute drive time from the site by car

Parameters Plan


This image: a photo of an empty warehouse. The map: a map showing the parameters plan of the site used to define maximum floorspace and building heights of HNRFI. There are various zones across the site, labelled A - J. Clicking on a map label brings up detailed information about the proposed parameters for that zone.

The nature of Strategic Rail Freight Interchange (SRFI) developments is such that some degree of flexibility is needed when schemes are being developed to allow the development to respond to market requirements as they arise.

The parameters plan defines the maximum floor space and building heights of HNRFI. It also outlines other aspects such as the size of landscaped areas and where the rail elements and the scheme would likely be located.


info Click on the map markers to find out more about the proposed parameters for each zone.


Map key
Hinckley NRFI red line boundary
Open land / landscaping including bunding, attenuation ponds, public footpaths and bridleways and A47 Link Road and estate road infrastructure
Historic woodland protection zone
Watercourse
Existing rail corridor
Rail freight interchange including A47 Link Road and bridge infrastructure
Rail corridor within development zones
New Bridge Over Rail Line
Development zone for site hub
Line of A47 link Road and estate roads
Deviation Potential to estate roads. The boundaries of zones through which a limit of deviation runs will change depending on the final alignment of the infrastructure within the limit of deviation
Noise attenuation (acoustic fencing or landscape screening)
Development Signage Locations
Rerouting of existing linkage from Bridge Farm to new highway infrastructure
Development Zones
Zone parameters

Explore Our Vision


This image: a CGI of the proposed development entrance. The map: the map shows an illustrative masterplan of the site, with map markers showing CGIs of the proposed development entrance, development estate road, new public open space linked to Burbage Common and woods, and railport.

Please note: The illustrative masterplan shows one way that the project could be delivered within the parameters defined in the previous section.

Tritax Symmetry (Hinckley) Ltd is bringing forward proposals for the Hinckley National Rail Freight Interchange (HNRFI) at junction 2 of the M69. The scheme is considered to be a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project (NSIP).

The site will include the delivery of:

  • New railway infrastructure, including railway sidings and freight terminal, known as the railport,
  • M69 upgrade works, including additional northbound and southbound slip roads and a new access road connecting to an internal road network,
  • A new rail bridge and junction at B4668 / A47 Leicester Road, and
  • Land for landscape and planting works, ecological mitigation, drainage balancing ponds, footpaths, and cycleway links.


info Click on the map markers to read more about the proposals and to view illustative images of how the proposals may look.


Map key
Illustrative images of the proposals
Information about the proposals

Strategic Importance of Rail


This image: an illustrative photo an intermodal train & gantry. The map: the map shows an illustrative masterplan of the site, with map markers showing stock images illustrating how the site may look in operation. The images show as reachstacker and HGV container lifter, an intermodal train and gantry, a gantry loading container, and rail freight connected buildings.

Only a small percentage of goods imported to and exported from the UK go via air; everything else is moved via ships or by rail through the Channel Tunnel.

Rail freight is the most efficient mode of transport to deal with high volumes of containerised goods, with one train taking around 50+ HGVs movements off the road network.

The shortage of HGV drivers available to do long haul routes means increasing the capacity of the rail freight infrastructure is critical to maintaining and growing the region's economy.

There is a huge advantage for businesses located on or very close to a Strategic Rail Freight Interchange. They can minimise the delivery cost between the railport and their business, making the rail proposition much better than using HGVs.

To view the formal consultation documents for the Strategic Importance of Rail section, please click here.


info Click on the map markers to view photos of how the site may look in operation.


Map key
Illustrative photos of how the site may look

The Positive Benefits of HNRFI


This image: an illustrative photo of an employee working in a logistics warehouse. The map: the map has been replaced with a green triangular graphic with the words 'Hinckley National Rail Freight Interchange: Change for the good'. From each corner of the triangle there is a green button which, when clicked on, shows more information about the positive benefits of HNRFI: jobs, delivering infrastructure, and green agenda.

Rail freight services are hugely more environmentally friendly than HGVs at 35% of the environmental equivalent impact of running an HGV.

As the economy moves further online with consumers buying goods and services directly from providers, more stock has to be held in centralised logistics buildings and delivered door to door in smaller consignments rather than stored on shop shelves.

The change provides an opportunity for rail to reduce the overall environmental impact of logistics nationally. Transporting goods to and from ports and between regions in containers via rail is an immediate win.

The potential for rail-based express services to trunk parcel and roller cage deliveries by rail into stations is the next step in securing even more environmental benefits of rail freight.

HNRFI is future-proofed by design.

To view the formal consultation documents for the Positive Benefits of HNRFI section, please click here.


info Click on the map markers to read more about the positive benefits of HNRFI.

Local and wider highway improvements


This image: an illustrative photo showing highway improvements underway. The map: a map of the wider Hinckley - Nuneaton - Leicester region, showing the HNRFI red line boundary, and multiple map markers indicating junctions which have been assessed (grey markers) and junctions with physical works proposed (green markers). Clicking on each marker shows more detail about its location and the work proposed (if applicable).

The proposed access to the site will be via the M69 Junction 2, with an additional arm into the site. As part of the access, the following infrastructure is proposed:

  • new south-facing slips (off and on slips) at Junction 2,
  • signalisation of M69 J2,
  • a new link road (A47 Link Road), and
  • a new roundabout junction on the B4668 - Leicester Road.

The A47 link road will link Junction 2 of the M69 through the site, crossing the railway via a bridge, connecting to the B4668 (Leicester Road) and ultimately the A47.

The road through the site is designed as a dual carriageway between the M69 Junction 2 and the site access (approximately 990 metres) and as a single carriageway between the site access and the B4668 (Leicester Road) to the west of the site (approximately 1,500 metres).

Across the strategic modelled area, 38 junctions were reviewed in detail for impacts from the development. Of these eight required junction upgrades to improve capacity and safety, two locations also were identified to introduce traffic calming or public realm interventions.

For more information on the Transport Working Group, Eastern Villages Bypass, Strategic Road Network Interfaces and Narborough Crossing, please click here.

To view the formal consultation documents for the Local and wider highway improvements section, please click here.


info Click on a map marker to find out more about the proposed physical works.


Map key
Hinckley NRFI red line boundary
Junctions assessed
Physical works proposed
Motorways

Sustainable Travel


This image: an illustrative photo of a cyclist in a cycle lane. The map: a map of the illustrative masterplan, overlaid with existing and proposed new footpaths and bridleways in and around the site. There are green map markers which display more detail about the key proposals for the public rights of way around the site. Local cycle connections to and from Hinckley, Leicester and Nuneaton can also be seen by zooming the map out.

Sustainable access has been considered for staff and contractors employed at the site. The location is close to several key settlements within a 5km radius. This presents an excellent opportunity for employees to use active travel modes to access the site.

A wide range of Public Rights of Way (PRoW) are present within the site and its surrounding area, and there is good provision of informal open space.

The PRoW strategy for the site has identified a capacity for improvement in terms of connectivity, maintenance and better signposting. The key proposals at this stage are shown on the map.

To view the formal consultation documents for the Sustainable Travel section, please click here.


info Click on the map markers to find out more about the key proposals for the public rights of way in and around the site.

Zoom out and pan the map to view cycle connections to Hinckley, Leicester and Nuneaton.


Map key
Hinckley NRFI red line boundary
Key PRoW proposals
Proposed new bridleway
Proposed new footpath
Existing bridleway
Existing footpath
Local cycle routes
Cycleway
Cycle lane
National Cycle Network

Landscape & The Environment


This image: an image of how the site may look 15 years from completion, as seen from the north. The map: a map of the illustrative masterplan, with green map markers which, when clicked, show images of how the site currently looks and how it may look 15 years after completion.

A comprehensive assessment of the project’s environmental effects has been undertaken. This work is helping the design team to understand how the project could affect local amenities and identify measures to avoid or reduce significant adverse effects.

A wide range of measures are proposed, including:

  • new and diverted footpath links,
  • new areas of open space to the north and east of Burbage Common,
  • acoustic barriers to contain noise from the rail freight interchange,
  • an operational HGV routing strategy,
  • a lighting strategy and a landscape strategy for the whole site.


Many of the more significant environmental effects would arise temporarily during the construction phase of the development. In response, it is proposed to implement a comprehensive range of control plans covering:

  • construction traffic,
  • dust,
  • noise,
  • light,
  • drainage and waste management,
  • tree protection,
  • soil management,
  • archaeological investigation,
  • and ecological protection.


To view the formal consultation documents for the Landscape & The Environment section, please click here.


info Click on a map marker to view images of how the site surroundings currently look and how they may look 15 years after completion.


Map key
Hinckley NRFI red line boundary
Images of how the site surroundings currently look and how they may look 15 years after completion

Policy & Guidance


This image: a building at Symmetry Park, Swindon. The map: the map has been replaced by 12 grey buttons representing the policy documents used to inform the proposals for HNRFI. Clicking on a button brings up more information about that document and allows you to download the PDF document to read it in full.

Our proposals for the Hinckley National Rail Freight Interchange (HNRFI) have been informed by regional and national policies alongside guidance documents.

These documents explain why strategic freight infrastructure is essential for the regional and national economy.


info Click on a map marker to read more about that policy document. You will then have the option to download the document to read it in full.


Map key
Find out more about a policy document

The Consultation Process


This image: a building at Symmetry Park, Bicester. The map: the map has been replaced by 6 grey buttons, each representing a step in the consultation process, from the formal consultation opening in 2022 Q1, to the final decision being made on whether to grant or refuse development consent in 2023 Q4.

This statutory consultation process will run for eight weeks from Wednesday 12th January until Wednesday 9th March 2022.

It follows the non-statutory consultations on the proposals undertaken between October and December 2018 and a focused highways consultation held between July and September 2019.

Since the previous consultations were held, significant further technical and environmental work on the proposals has been undertaken. Consequently, this round of statutory consultation will provide information on our more developed proposals, including infrastructure and mitigation requirements.

After this statutory consultation period, your feedback will be reviewed and considered as the application is prepared to be submitted to the Planning Inspectorate later in the year.


info Click on a map marker to find out more about the consultation process.


Map key
Find out more about the consultation process

Next Steps


Thank you for taking the time to understand our proposals for the Hinckley National Rail Freight Interchange (HNRFI).

We would love to hear your thoughts on the project by clicking the green button below and completing a short survey.

The consultation will end on Wednesday 9th March 2022.


question_answer  Answer the feedback form here


Map key
Hinckley NRFI site location
Hinckley NRFI red line boundary

Contact Details


The project team can be contacted in the following ways:



A link to the Hinckley National Rail Freight Interchange website will also be available on the project's social media platforms:

Facebook (
Hinckley National Rail Freight Interchange – HNRFI)

Twitter (
@hinckleyNRFI)

Instagram (
hinckleynationalrailfreight)





An Engaged Space powered by Deetu.

Got a story to tell?
Get in touch.